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Water Authority Objection to Illegal Exchange Agreement

Oppose 7-5, Agreement with LADWP for Terminal Island Water Expansion Project

Oppose 7-4, Agreement with LADWP for Westside Area Water Recycling Project

Diverting recycled water could save Burbank thousands of dollars

Each year, Burbank releases more than 2 billion gallons of unused recycled water into the Los Angeles River, but a plan to divert some of that for use elsewhere could save the city thousands of dollars on the cost of importing potable water.

Under the proposed deal, the Burbank Water Reclamation Plant would redirect 110 million gallons of recycled water to North Hollywood each year, earning the utility credits that would be applied to the cost of importing potable water from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Those credits would effectively save the city about $180,000 annually.

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DWP to build groundwater treatment plants on Superfund site

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power plans to build the world’s largest groundwater treatment center over one of the largest Superfund pollution sites in the United States: the San Fernando Basin.

Two plants costing a combined $600 million to $800 million will restore groundwater pumping of drinking water from scores of San Fernando Valley wells that the DWP began closing in the 1980s, the utility said. The plants also will ensure that other wells remain open despite pollution plumes steadily migrating in their direction.

The plans mark a major shift at DWP, reversing a trend of recent decades in which the utility has offset diminishing use of groundwater with imports from Northern California and the eastern Sierra.

“By 2035, we plan to reduce our purchases of imported water by half,” said James McDaniel, the DWP’s senior assistant general manager.

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Water agency unfair to San Diego

Founded in 1928, the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) is a confederation of 27 local water agencies that stretches from the Mexican border north to Santa Barbara.

MWD has been the dominant purveyor of imported water to this region for most of its history, acting as a secret, shadow government. It created an impenetrable megalith that did as it wished until the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) dared to guarantee its own source of this vital resource and secure its own water supply.

This quest began in 1995 as a result of MWD’s arcane “preferential rights” policy, which gives the Los Angeles region privileged access to MWD’s water during a drought. About 85 percent of San Diego’s water supplies came from MWD. Los Angeles’ need for backup water in a drought could balloon from 34 percent to 65 percent or more.

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As water bills continue to climb, state launches audit of entire southeast L.A. County water system

The Downey Beat – The state has launched a sweeping audit of the area’s water system. In response to complaints from residents and city officials who say they are fed up with rising costs…